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If you’re already enjoying the benefits of a Ducted Gas Heating system but need a cooling solution for your home or office as well, it doesn’t make sense to pay for a second system of ducts and vents to be fitted. For these situations, an Add-On Cooling System is the solution. A condenser unit is installed on the exterior of your home and connects to the pre-existing Ducted Gas Heating system via a series of pipes. A unit installed inside your house then distributes hot or cold air throughout your house as you need. You may need an extra controller inside your house to control the Add-On Cooling system.

Running Costs:

Operating in the same manner as a Reverse-Cycle air conditioning system, within the condenser runs a compressor which runs refrigerant gas through a series of tubes. A fan blows warm air over the tubes to cool it down, then pushes the chilled air through the ducts in your roof-space and through your ceiling vents. Given the compressor requires power to operate, the running cost of the airconditioning system most often ranges from $1.30 – $6.00* per hour. More advanced systems can utilise a system of “zones”, which allow you to selectively cool individual or multiple rooms at a time. This avoids the cost of cooling an entire house! Maintenance of the system is low, with most manufacturers only requiring 6 monthly filter and vent cleaning.

Unit Cost:

As the Add-On Cooling system piggy-backs your pre-existing Ducted Gas Heating system and avoids the need for additional ducting and vents to be installed, the cost to purchase the system is often less than that of a full Reverse-Cycle air conditioner. On the flip-side, as the system is designed to run through a large network of ducts, the size of the systems is not as varied and they are typically designed for medium to large houses and offices. A cheaper system may cost around $5,000 installed, and the larger more advanced systems can run up to $10,000 or more.

Installation Cost:

Given the more complex installation required for an Add-On Cooling system, the cost to install is variable. Factors that can influence costs include the brand and age of the existing heating system and ducts, the mounting location of the condenser unit and the size and height of building being fitted. The best way to get a good understanding of the costs involved with purchasing and installing an Add-On Cooling system is to contact us to arrange your free quote.

*cost may vary from household to household

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Reverse-Cycle air conditioning is widely accepted as the most effective way of heating or cooling your home or office. The system is made up of two units, a condenser (which is normally outside the house) and a controller, positioned inside your roof if you’ve bought ducted, or mounted on your wall if you’ve bought a smaller system. If you need to cool down, the system uses the condenser unit outside to rapidly chill a series of gas-filled tubes. A fan then pushes warm air over the tubes, cooling it instantly, and then directs the chilled air into your house. The warm air from inside your house is pulled up into a return-air grille and taken outside. If heating is required, the system reverses the process – pushing warm air through the ceiling vents and pulling the cold air into the return-air grille. A benefit of Reverse-Cycle ducted air-conditioning is the ability to add “zones” to your system; this allows you to choose which rooms are cooled down and avoids unnecessarily cooling unused rooms.

Running Costs:

As the Reverse-Cycle system requires a compressor to run and a strong fan to move the air between the systems the running costs are a little higher than those of an Evaporative Cooler, but the tradeoff is effectiveness. While an Evaporative Cooler will reduce the ambient temperature by up to 8°, a Reverse-Cycle system allows you to choose a desired temperature as low as 16° and maintains that temperature for as long as required. For a large system cooling an entire house the cost to run ranges from $1.30 – $6.00* per hour, but if zoning is used that cost is reduced. Maintenance is basic and infrequent, with most systems only requiring the filter to be cleaned at regular intervals.

Unit Cost:

Given the diversity of houses and cooling requirements there are several different Reverse-Cycle systems on the market, and a large range of manufacturers. A smaller wall-mounted split-system unit, designed to cool individual rooms, can be as cheap as $900 – $1000 to purchase and install. As the size of the area to cool increases so does the cost of the unit. A mid-range wall-mounted split system, with the condenser mounted to the roof, will typically cost between $2,000 – $5,000, and a complex roof-mounted, ducted refrigerated system can cost closer to $15,000 fully installed.

Installation Cost:

Given the more complex nature of the Reverse-Cycle system, the cost to install can vary. Considerations when quoting installation include the mounting location of the control unit and condenser, the number of rooms to receive ducts, if the house is single or double story, and if there is a pre-existing system to remove and dispose of. The best way to accurately estimate the total cost of the system and installation is to call us and arrange your free quote.

*cost may vary from household to household

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Between the two most common types of air-conditioning, Evaporative and Reverse-Cycle, Evaporative Coolers are often the cheapest to run and cheapest to install, and a favourite in Summer for the drier areas of Australia. By pushing air through dampened pads, the system uses cool water to naturally push the hot air out of your house. This process reduces the ambient temperature by up to 8° while being whisper-quiet in operation. In addition to their energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly cooling method, Evaporative Coolers add moisture to the air in your home, helping avoid dry skin, and are most effective when used with open doors and windows; giving you a constant supply of clean, fresh and cool air.

Running Costs:

Evaporative Coolers typically only require a water supply and power for fans to drive the air. Compared to a refrigerated unit, an evaporative cooler has very little in the way of high-energy using parts; a typical evaporative cooler running on a hot day might cost you between $0.20 – $0.30* per hour or around $2.40 per day**, and ongoing maintenance is minimal. In comparison, refrigerated air-conditioning units run a compressor to cool the air and contain a sophisticated series of tubes and gaskets to hold in the refrigerant gas. This increases the per hour cost to anywhere between $1.30 – $6.00*.

Unit Cost:

As every household has different cooling needs it makes sense that there are a wide range of Evaporative models on the market. A smaller system, designed to cool units, townhouses and smaller stand-alone properties, can be as cheap as $2,700 to purchase and install. Even the largest and most advanced systems on the market, designed for high-usage households with many rooms to cool, only cost between $3,000 – $5,000. In comparison, for a small ducted reverse-cycle airconditioning unit the purchase cost is typically $2,500 or more, not including installation. –

Installation Cost:

Given the simple construction of the evaporative cooling system, installation is quick and easy. The main unit is mounted to a central location on your roof, and ducts are then run through the roof-space to the rooms you need cooled. Costs are based on the number of ducts required, the size of the house, complexity of the installation location or if your previous system needs removing first. Due to the variable nature of the installation, we recommend you contact us for a free quote.

*costs may vary based from household to household **cost may vary, daily cost based on an average running time of 12 hour

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For a heating solution that warms your entire house without breaking the bank, Natural-Gas Ducted Heating is the clear choice. It’s safe to run, energy efficient and environmentally friendly, and as the heating process doesn’t remove the moisture from the air it won’t cause dry skin or eyes. A gas powered Ducted Heating system is a single self-contained unit; natural gas is ignited in a safe, controlled chamber, which heats a series of tubes. A fan then pushes cool air over the tubes, warming it up, then pushes the warm air through ducts in the ceiling and out of ceiling- or floor-mounted vents. You can select a temperature using the interior wall-mounted control panel as well as selecting one or more rooms, or “zones”, to heat; this saves heating the entire house and further reduces the running costs.

Running Costs:

As the Ducted Gas Heating system is simple in operation, it’s running costs are based on the natural gas used and the power to run the fan and are rated as 4-, 5- and 6-star systems. On average, you can achieve a savings of up to 40% – 60% when compared to an equivalent Reverse-Cycle heating system. For a large 6-star system heating an entire house the cost to run ranges from $0.20 – $0.80* per hour, but if zoning is used that cost is reduced. Maintenance is basic and doesn’t need to be performed often, with most systems only requiring the filters and vents to be cleaned at 6-monthly intervals.

Unit Cost:

Given the wide range of house sizes and heating needs, there are many Ducted Gas Heating systems on the market sold by a range of companies. A smaller 3-star unit, designed to heat smaller houses, units or offices will generally set you back around $1,400* to purchase and install. As the size of the area to heat, number of ducts and energy star-rating increases, expect to pay more as a result. A 5- star system, ducted and installed, will typically cost close to $3,000*, however even the most complex 6-star energy rated system only costs around $3,500* fully installed.

Installation Cost:

As the Ducted Gas Heating system is less complex to install than an equivalent Reverse-Cycle system, the cost to install is less but still highly variable. Considerations when quoting installation include the mounting location of the heating unit, the number of ducts or floor vents required, if the house is single or double story, and if there is a pre-existing system to remove and dispose of. The best way to accurately estimate the total cost of the system and installation is to call us and arrange your free quote.

*cost may vary from household to household

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Ducted air-conditioning units provide more efficient cooling for large areas, but this comes with a greater cost all around. Ducted air conditioning cost will vary, but keep in mind that you will have to plan for these ducts to be retrofitted in your home if they’re not already there. Rooms with AC will have vents or grills installed, and there is a main control panel which allows you to set the temperature for the entire house. This convenience, along with the costs of running multiple units, are the major benefits of using ducted AC.

If you’re thinking about installing a ducted air conditioning unit for your home or office space, it’s a good idea to have a clear understanding about ducted air conditioning costs. Knowing what you’re getting into means understanding all of the costs associated with running and maintaining a ducted AC unit, in addition to the upfront cost of the unit and its installation. Creating an accurate budget is impossible without first figuring out all of these associated costs.

Ducted air-conditioning costs as well as the prices for the installation itself will vary based on the nature of your home, including factors like how well your home is insulated and how long you operate the system in a given day. The size and type of the system also matters, and you should also factor in potential maintenance costs no matter how reliable your chosen unit is purported to be.

Ducted Airconditioning Running Costs 

The cost of running a ducted AC unit can generally be divided between the actual costs of running the unit and the cost of maintaining it. Ducted airconditioning running costs are more predictable overall, while maintenance costs can easily turn out to vary wildly from any estimates you might be able to make beforehand.

The cost of running ducted refirgerated cooling depends a lot on the size and type of the system that you’re using. It also depends a lot on how long you run it for in a given day, since running it for longer periods will mean more power consumption. The temperature that you set your air conditioning to will also have an effect, since it will take more energy to cool to a lower temperature and to maintain it. If you’re using an efficient system and your home is well insulated, operating costs will be considerably less than running an older or less efficient model or not having proper insulation in your home.

The cost of maintaining a ducted refirgerated cooling unit depends mostly on the model and its manufacturer, as well as a few other variables like the specialist who maintains the unit. A state-of-the-art unit should give you fewer problems when it comes to operations, and fewer visits by service technicians and replacement parts should mean lower overall operating costs. Older machines and those that are run more frequently may need more frequent servicing, and an important point is to look at the costs of replacement parts for the unit you’re using or considering. Any appliance will generally need maintenance over its lifetime, so don’t assume that just because you’re going for a high quality unit that you can skip maintenance altogether.

Ducted AC Prices 

Two of the most important factors in ducted airconditioning cost are the brand and size of the unit. While smaller units are generally less costly than larger ones, the price will also depend on the brand of the unit in question. You can expect to pay:

  • Lower Price Range – for a small unit, suitable for a small home or an apartment
  • Medium Price Range – for a medium unit, for a 3 bedroom or single storey home
  • Higher Price Range – for a multi-storied home or more than 3 bedrooms

As you can see above, ducted air conditioning cost varies a bit depending on the size and layout of your home. These are rough estimates which vary on a lot of factors, and there’s a chance that you might cool a bigger space on a smaller budget or spend a lot on cooling your single bedroom apartment. It will also depend a bit on the materials used for your home’s construction, since different materials and construction techniques have an effect on how quickly your home heats and cools. If you have a well insulated home or one constructed from brick, chances are that it will be easier to cool than in other cases, since you won’t have to switch on the AC as often or for as long.

Cooling a whole home when you don’t use all of it might not make a lot of sense, and you can actually opt for creating zones of your house where there’s AC and where there isn’t. If your home has an empty bedroom, there’s no sense in fitting ductwork to cool that room. Choosing not to cool certain rooms will not only save you money on the initial installation costs, but could mean that you can make do with a smaller unit than you otherwise thought and save on your monthly energy bills. Making arrangements for zoning airconditioned and non-airconditioned parts of your house might take a little bit of planning and arrangement, but it can make using ducted AC more economically feasible in some cases.


Ducted Split Systems 

Split systems are generally cheaper to install and run, since they fit into a single room and don’t require ductwork to be installed. While the entire unit will be outside the home in the case of a ducted system, a split system will have the condenser placed outside and the rest of the unit inside. If you’re only looking to cool one room, this may be the most economical option, but cooling multiple rooms will basically require the installation of multiple units. If you’re trying to cool a smaller space or only part of your house, a ducted split system may be what you’re looking for. While they require more ceiling space, a ducted split unit will use less energy than a normal ducted AC. Like split systems, these generally house part of the unit outside with the rest of the unit in the ceiling. If you want to demarcate different ‘zones’ and only run one AC at a time, it may actually make sense to go with multiple ducted split systems. Since these units are smaller, they generally use less electricity than a ducted AC unit. Split systems offer the chance for a lower investment price than the starting ducted air conditioning cost, starting from around $X for a small unit.

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